Navy SEAL Outed As Porn Star Jewels Jade's Husband

SAN DIEGO, Calif.—If one thing should be abundantly clear by now, it's that over the long haul, porn performers have little chance of keeping their real identities secret from an inquisitive public—and the more famous the porn star or the more high-profile the star's real identity is, the sooner it's likely to be exposed. (Though to be very clear: This is NOT a Good Thing. After all, none of the Hollywood trades ever referred to Cary Grant by his real name, Archibald Leach, nor until recently, Joan Crawford by her real name, Lucille LeSueur.)

Take the case of Jewels Jade's husband Jay Voom. Turns out he's a highly decorated Navy officer, having received several valor awards throughout his 23 years of service, is currently a Chief Special Warfare Officer, and for a time was even the face of the SEAL program on its website. That's about as high-profile as you can get!

Jewels, on the other hand, began her porn career in 2001, took a break between 2003 and 2006, then returned, though in recent years, the vast majority of her work has been online in scenes for her own site, , as well as Brazzers, Digital Sin and Dogfart, for a total of more than 230 on-camera appearances.

During her three-year hiatus, Jade spent time raising her child, getting her nursing degree ... and founding, with her husband, the Virginia real estate firm Schmidt and Wolf Associates which, according to the in the San Diego Union-Tribune, "created nearly $1.8 million in personal debt" through "losses at multiple rental properties."

So to pay the bills, Jade went back to the adult industry, first stripping, then appearing again in hardcore productions—and when Voom's military service had him based in Coronado, Calif., Jade continued her work, but this time, according to the Union-Tribune, "To further cut expenses, Jade said she recruited her husband to help out as an unpaid performer."

Jade also noted that many of Voom's Navy co-workers knew of his extra-curricular activities.

"They knew about it at work," she said. "He got called in and they said, 'Look, keep it on the low, don't mention the SEAL name and blah, blah, blah.' He was always pretty open about it with the command. I mean, honestly, all of his buddies knew about it. Everybody knew about it."

So then the question becomes, why is anyone making a big deal about it now? It's not as if Voom ever let on in any of his scenes that he was a Navy man, let alone a SEAL, and while Jade had mentioned in interviews that her husband was a SEAL, she never named him.

But now the Naval Special Warfare Command at Coronado has opened an investigation into Voom, questioning "whether [Voom] violated rules mandating that SEALs obtain advance approval from their commanders for outside work, and whether the SEAL brass has been quietly condoning his film work."

And all this for a guy who's scheduled to retire before the end of the year, and never got any money for his XXX performing.

"The military has a long history of punishing active-duty service members and even veterans who do everything from writing unauthorized memoirs, to taking side jobs without permission, to engaging in work seen as detrimental to the military’s reputation," the Union-Tribune reported. "The armed forces' rules for secondary employment have the force of a 'punitive instruction,' which means violators can be tried under the Uniform Code of Military Justice for lack of compliance."

Of course, with the new conservative religious bent of military higher-ups under Trump, it's possible they could try to make some sort of example out of Voom—but who knows? Maybe there's still a little compassion left for a 23-year highly decorated veteran ...

Pictured, l-r: Jewels Jade, Jay Voom, India Summer.